• Home
  • Books
  • Archives
  • Subscribe
  • Contributors
  • Contact Us  
  • Blog  
  • Advertise on AR and GH
  •  

    Published 11-26-2019

     

    Nothing is more welcoming on a cold night than a warm fire flickering in an old fashioned cast iron stove. It's really a gas heater but it looks and feels like a real old fashioned wood one. Naturally, there is back up heat and air conditioning if you visit in summer. When I visited Two Casitas in November, Santa Fe's nighttime temperature dropped to 19%. It didn't bother me at all. I was so cozy inside reading a book in a comfortable bed and watching the little blue flames flicker and dance.  

    When I turned off the bedside lamp, the soft glow of the flames lulled me to sleep. It helped to know that come morning I was only about three quarters of a mile from the Plaza where I would be heading and even less to Canyon Road where there were lots of art galleries, boutique shops, and restaurants.

    When I awoke the next morning, the cottage was warm and felt so welcoming. There was a complete kitchen equipped with pots, pans, dishes and glasses where I could prepare a real breakfast rather than the impersonal mini fridge and microwave of a hotel. A tea pot stood on the stove for my morning tea.

    The bathroom shower has such interesting details, like the very New Mexico looking tiles in the shower and the mirror over the lavatory that looks like it might have come right out of old Mexico. There is lots of tile in the kitchen as well. Interesting pattern on the counters and backboards and a red tile floor that looked like it might have been handmade.

     Click her for 360 video: 

    In the main room there is a lovely coffee table in front of the shiny leather sofa. The table seems to be a piece of petrified wood sanded and polished to fit the décor of a home that must have seen much of life in its 100 plus years. A delightful fountain and light combination offers soothing flowing water sounds and a soft light.  The cottage is real adobe so there are no sharp corners. Everything about the cottage is soft and curved.

    In the back yard there are cute paw prints and hand prints in the cement just outside the back door. My imagination found it easy to picture children of another era playing and romping there with their dog after they made the prints. Because of the weather I didn’t get to enjoy the yard much but remnants of a garden hinted at a summer of fragrant beauty. Likewise had the weather been a bit warmer, the hot tub would have beckoned to me. Perhaps I would have barbequed in one of the two barbeque grills there.

    To the front of the casita there is a sheltering porch. People in the time when this cottage was built knew how to shelter from the elements. They didn’t have all the modern conveniences but they had a sense of place. This small dwelling feels welcoming as if all the people that went before you left a message for modern visitor that says, "Welcome. Mi Casa es su Casa."

    I am so thankful Glamping Hub sponsered me for this stay.

     

     

     

     

     

    We'd love your comments!

     

     

     

    Connect with us on:

    Twitter FacebookInstagram
    Google+Pinterest

    American Roads and
    Global Highways has so many great articles you
    may want to search it for your favorite places
    or new exciting destinations.

    Live Search

     

     





     

     



    Public Disclosure-- Please Read
    The FTC has a law requiring web sites to let their readers know if any of the stories are "sponsored" or compensated. We also are to let readers know if any of our links are ads. Most are not. They are just a way to direct you  to more information about the article where the link is placed. We also have several ads on our pages.  They are clearly marked as ads. I think readers are smart enough to know an ad when they see one but to obey the letter of the law, I am putting this statement here to make sure everyone understands. American Roads and Global Highways may contain affiliate links or ads. Further, as their bios show, most of the feature writers are professional travel writers. As such we are frequently invited on press trips, also called fam trips. On these trips most of our lodging, dining, admissions fees and often plane fare are covered by the city or firm hosting the trip. It is an opportunity to visit places we might not otherwise be able to visit. However, no one tells us what to write about those places. All opinions are 100% those of the author of that feature column.  .  

    Privacy Policy/ ArchivesContributors / Subscribe to American Roads Books by Kathleen Walls / ContactSponsor or Advertise/ American Roads & Global Highways Home Page
    Copyright 2017 AmericanRoads.net, all rights reserved   |   website hosted by ci-Interactive